Nominee program has double standard

Nominee program has double standard I have a friend from Japan who is trying to stay in Canada by applying under the Yukon Nominee Program and she is being told by the Yukon government that she must have six months previous experience in the field she is

I have a friend from Japan who is trying to stay in Canada by applying under the Yukon Nominee Program and she is being told by the Yukon government that she must have six months previous experience in the field she is applying for.

The place where she is working as a cashier right now needs cashiers under the program, but she has no previous cashier experience other than being a waitress where she handled cash and operated a cash register. Right now the business is not hiring waitresses for the restaurant, so she cannot qualify for the program and will have to leave Canada at the end of January.

This is not a medical-profession position being sought. How much experience does a person really need to be a cashier or waitress? Does the program deprive Yukon businesses the prospect of hiring an employee because the applicant has no experience in a field where no skill is really necessary? This business can hire an inexperienced Yukoner and train them, but can only accept Yukon nominees who have previous experience.

I have recently found out that cashiers at Tim Hortons and McDonald’s do not require experience as cashiers. It seems that these two companies are labeled as restaurants and therefore the cashiers are considered servers. So my friend, who has server experience, can work as a cashier at either of these two companies under the Yukon Nominee Program, but not at the grocery store she presently works for.

I have heard that the larger businesses (Canadian Tire, MacDonald’s and Walmart) have cashiers (and other positions) working for them who had no previous experience, yet have been brought to Canada under the program and trained.

My question: is there a double standard here for larger employers?

Stephen Pike

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