No disaster in developing Peel

No disaster in developing Peel Let's be honest about the Peel. Ninety-eight per cent of most Yukoners, including First Nations, have never been to the Peel River watershed simply because they can't afford to fly; very few have the time or resources to b

BodyNo disaster in developing Peel

Let’s be honest about the Peel. Ninety-eight per cent of most Yukoners, including First Nations, have never been to the Peel River watershed simply because they can’t afford to fly; very few have the time or resources to be able to hike or boat in.

I heard on CBC the outrage of the outfitters about possible development on the Peel watershed. Face the facts, these outfitters would like to have a third of the Yukon for their own private playground to serve the elite of the elite of the hunters and to hell with the economy and the rest of us trying to make a living.

Granted, they do hire a few Yukoners and contribute to the economy, but when you compare that to possible mineral development, oil and gas exploration, and the economic benefits for all Yukoners, there is absolutely no comparison. We already know there is a large iron ore deposit, oil, gas, copper, gold, silver, lead and zinc, and who knows what else is in reserve.

I’m proud to call myself a Yukoner. I raised a family here and appreciate the pristine wilderness and quality of life but let’s be honest, any development of the Peel watershed is not going to be a disaster. There is nothing wrong with responsible development. We have plenty of untouched wilderness here in the Yukon, like the under-used Kluane National Park and other parks taking over 15 per cent of our total land mass. As Yukoners we can’t afford to take a third of the Yukon’s land and set it aside for the exclusive use of the elite. That just does not make Yukon common sense.

Al Falle

Whitehorse/Body