Mining built the Yukon

Mining built the Yukon I was born and raised in Keno. I come from a mining background, my father was a miner before me. I still own claims and property in Keno. Keno City is a mining town with more than 100 years of mining history. This history is proudl

I was born and raised in Keno. I come from a mining background, my father was a miner before me. I still own claims and property in Keno.

Keno City is a mining town with more than 100 years of mining history. This history is proudly documented at the Keno City Mining Museum.

Artifacts and displays were donated by the mining community.

Roads, power lines, recreation facilities are all there because of mining and money from mining companies.

Historically, the original mill was located at the site proposed by Alexco for the new mill. All the roads coming off the mountains from the ore bodies go through Keno City. They were built by the mines.

For decades, miners dedicated and lost their lives to build a strong and thriving community.

Starting In the late ‘80s until recently, mining was not viable because of low metal prices. Money was put into the mining museum to keep people employed and to encourage tourism, all the while knowing that there was still great mining potential in the area.

Governments are giving incentives for mining from one hand. From the other, they are giving grants for environmentalists to further their causes against mining, as well as making such stringent rules and regulations that inhibit mining, especially smaller operations.

New terminology creates unnecessary concern about mining processes. For example, after moving ore from underground into the open, we now have “acid” rock.

I am tired of a few self-interested hypocrites trying to dictate what goes on in Keno City and the surrounding area. The majority of these people have made a good living from mining companies over the years. These people are trying to take over an active mining area using government grants to make hiking trails, butterfly sanctuaries, claim reclamation, etc. without any consultation with claim holders, yet expect consultation at every turn from the mining industry.

Most of the consultation meetings are held during the day when those of us who work cannot attend. Mining continues to become more expensive and more regulated. A handful of people shouldn’t be adding to that expense. I am confused why environmentalists would choose to live in a historical and active mining area.

Mining creates jobs. People with jobs need places to live, stores, schools, hospitals, nurses, doctors, social workers and recreation facilities.

Miners contribute to our society. They are willing to compromise and adapt their practices, but not to the extent of giving up their livelihood.

The whole Yukon benefits from mining and will continue to benefit from mining as long as it is allowed to continue.

Kris Pavlovich

Mayo

See more letters pages 7 and 8.