Miley Cyrus, a natural progression

Miley Cyrus, a natural progression For the last month, I have been baffled. I am not confused over the controversy and scandal surrounding the single Blurred Lines, with it's overly provocative music video and controversial lyrics. Nor am I confused as

For the last month, I have been baffled. I am not confused over the controversy and scandal surrounding the single Blurred Lines, with it’s overly provocative music video and controversial lyrics.

Nor am I confused as to how a sweet little girl like Miley Cyrus could go from having the reputation of Hannah Montana to the wrecking-ball reputation she sports nowadays. No, What really mystifies and disturbs me is how people seem to be shocked and even surprised that these things are happening.

The first time I heard of Much Music, I was 11. I had been raised in a fairly sheltered home, not entirely removed, but far away enough that I was unfamiliar with artists such as Britney Spears and Madonna. I will never forget the first Britney music video I saw. It was Toxic (remember her provocative flight attendant outfit?), and I thought it was very shocking to see that level of sexuality on TV. Now, of course, she is considered tame by television standards.

We live in a hypersexualized society, where television shows such as True Blood and Spartacus are produced and aired for anyone of any age group to watch. I have watched both shows, and by any standard, they are pornographic. Both of these shows, though targeting different audiences, have some very similar elements. Both have very explicit sex scenes in every single episode, and both television shows portray violence at a level that in itself becomes a form of pornography.

So why are we surprised that the music industry is following that same path? It seems to me that people, for the most part, seem to be a little too loudly proclaiming their surprise at the way things have progressed. As for myself, that 11-year-old me knew then what was coming.

A wise woman once told me that there is no greater curse than to see the problem at hand, but not be smart enough to fix it. I think the problem is that North American society has become lax in its moral standards, and opulent in its desires. Unfortunately, I do not have a solution. Hopefully someone smarter than I am will be able to solve this before too long. Until then, I am keeping the now aptly named “boob tube” turned off.

Telek Rogan

Whitehorse