March just the beginning

On Saturday Jan. 21, I marched with the upbeat, and bigger than expected, crowd of diverse people standing up for rights and truths we all cherish.

On Saturday Jan. 21, I marched with the upbeat, and bigger than expected, crowd of diverse people standing up for rights and truths we all cherish.

The news over the weekend, however, diminished the excitement and euphoria of that event.

Trump took action to reverse progress on women’s reproductive rights in the U.S. and beyond.

His press secretary lambasted the press for telling the truth about the size of the inauguration day crowd rather than the inflated numbers the administration wanted to have reported.

References to climate change were deleted from the White House website, and Trump advocated a rebuilding of the coal industry. (Really? Who would want more cases of black lung and acid rain-killed forests?)

And ultra-right wing politicians around the world are flexing their muscles and thumping their chests.

So we will have to do more than a one-time march. We might have to do what the East Germans did to bring down the Wall — march every week. Or maybe we’ll march on the 21st of every month.

Some of us will stop using Twitter. Some of us will drop our subscriptions to newspapers and magazines that report false news. Some of us will use social media to share important information, like that other countries have NOT taken away American jobs, as Trump claims. Rather, American multi-millionaires and billionaires have shipped jobs overseas, where wages are pathetically low, in order to increase their own personal wealth. Some of us will boycott products made by those corporations.

Some of us will communicate directly with U.S. and Canadian politicians to demand moral action. Some of us will choose other travel destinations than the U.S. or those resorts owned by the wealthy class. Some of us will donate money and time to organizations doing important work for humanity and the environment, organizations which could lose government funding. Some of us will write, draw, dance, sculpt, and sing positive messages.

And all of us must stay informed via reliable honest sources. And all of us must take care to keep up our spirits, to keep the faith.

Dianne Homan,

Whitehorse

Just Posted

Yukon Fish and Game Association opposed to moose management proposals

Executive director Eric Schroff said he thinks Yukon government needs to be more transparent

WYATT’S WORLD

Wyatt’s World

Casino taking more time with mine proposal

Statement not expected to be submitted to YESAB until Dec. 31, 2021

New act allows Yukon College to become Yukon University

The official launch of Yukon University will happen May 8 with a convocation ceremony

Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in to hold general election in April

On top of voting for chief, three councillors, citizens will vote for a deputy chief for first time

Yukon’s minimum wage set to increase by $1 to $13.71 in April

The increase will make the Yukon’s minimum wage the fourth-highest in the country

City news, briefly

Some of the decisions made at the Whitehorse council meeting on Feb 17

Yukonomist: Three questions on Yukon Zinc and China

The case heard recently in Yukon Supreme Court is particularly troubling

Commentary: Highway plans will negatively impact safety

The proposed Alaska Highway work will impact our safety, our communities and our environment.

Olivia Webster is the final musher to finish the Yukon Quest

‘I guess I’ve always been a grandpa’s girl and he’s my best friend, so I kind of wanted to be like him and so I did it’

Yukon’s Rob Cooke and company finish 10th in the 2020 Yukon Quest

Cooke and his 14 Siberians crossed the finish line at 9:07 a.m. on Feb. 15 in Whitehorse

Lights Out Yukon Invitational Basketball Tournament bigger than ever in sixth year

“Honestly, it was the smoothest tournament I think we’ve run yet”

Most Read