Letter to the Editor

Getting his shots in Open letter to Dr. Bryce Larke, Yukon’s medical officer of health: Like others in the territory, I have received the…

Getting his shots in

Open letter to Dr. Bryce Larke, Yukon’s medical officer of health:

Like others in the territory, I have received the circular advising us all to get our “shots.”

I understand where you are coming from.

It is something you believe in passionately.

I suspect — but also it is part of your conditioning from childhood if you were  raised in this culture — that vaccination is a must.

I am not here to criticize you, but to ask respectfullly for you to listen to what I wish to share with you. I want you to understand why I am opposed so strongly to this almost mandated requirement of our population.

Here’s my story:

I have had three serious illnesses in my life — two of which were caused by vaccine injections.

The third, mastoid, was not, so far as I know.

In the early ‘40s I was given the usual small pox vaccination when I was six or seven.

I promptly went down with spinal and cerebral meningitis.

I was too weak to be put to sleep, so I was held down on the bed while they put the needle up my spine to draw off the fluid.

I can remember it as if it was yesterday!

This was in Quebec City in 1941.

“They” said it was faulty vaccine.

The second situation occurred when I was posted to Karachi by my employer — The HongKong & Shanghai Bank — which wanted me to have the yellow fever and typhoid “shots.”

They insisted on the typhoid when I asked that I not be required to have these inoculations.

I didn’t want to lose my job so I gave in.

A few weeks after arriving in Karachi — you guessed it — I went down with typhoid and also the secondary condition often associated with typhoid — pneumonia.

This was in 1962.

I now have a letter from a Harley Street physician in London who is strongly opposed to vaccination saying, “I am an allergic subject and should not be subjected to vaccination.”

I fully realize that my experience will not likely change your mind, but I would ask that you at least listen to what I have come to realize about this issue. Please.

Western medicine has become blinded by the glitter of its own creations!

North American societies are the world’s most affluent.

Sadly, we have also become, in the last 30-odd years or so, among the world’s sickest, notwithstanding some of the African societies and some others due to malnutrition /starvation.

We are now about three, almost four generations into the vaccination programs initiated by our governments under the pressure of our allopathic doctors and, I would have to add, the drug companies.

By injecting poison into our systems, even in such minute amounts, what we have done and are doing is to weaken our collective immune systems generation by generation.

So with each generation we are inheriting the weaker immune systems of our parents.

As a result, as a society, we have substantially weakened our immune systems generally making us increasingly more vulnerable to diseases.

The results are staring us in the face if we can but move beyond our conditioning and biases and be objective.

Certainly, there are other factors within our society that are causing so many illnesses, but it is the opinion of many of us that what I have shared above is a major contributing factor.

I am 72. I am in good health. I don’t need Viagra!

I refuse vaccination.

I eat organic foods. [I have been a vegetarian since I was 19 although I will eat fish if out socially.

I prefer water from Yukon’s still clean creeks and lakes.

I don’t feel that I am a fanatic, but when I look around me seeing so much illness and related unhappiness affecting so many because of what we have, as a society, come to accept, it saddens me greatly.

Thank you for allowing me to express my opinions.

Hopefully you will reflect, over time, on what I have tried to draw to your attention.

Michael Brine

Faro

There are many good city taxi drivers

In a recent Yukon News article entitled City Cab Corruption, “Jim” overheard a taxi driver soliciting a young girl to engage in illicit sexual activity.

This is such a heinous sexual crime against our precious young people; unfortunately, “Jim” did not report this incident to the RCMP.

As a reputable taxi company, Premier Cabs strongly urges “Jim” to report this driver to the RCMP immediately.

This article suggests that subcontracted drivers (commonly known as owner-operators) are more apt to commit offences than hired drivers.

This is not necessarily true.

The owner-operator owns the vehicle and assumes full responsibility for complying with all relevant laws and regulations including the city bylaw, YTG taxi legislation, insurance, GST, income tax, Canada Pension Plan, workers’ compensation, mechanical inspection, and other legislative requirements such as labour law and human rights code.

The initial investment of an owner-operator ranges from $15,000 to $30,000.

Unlike owner-operators, hired drivers do not have any vested financial interest.

They are paid a certain percentage of their day’s earning.

If an owner-operator commits a crime, his vehicle may be impounded and his entire investment may be lost, whereas if a driver commits a crime, there is no vested financial interest to protect.

An owner-operator has more to lose than a hired driver if they commit a crime.

It is therefore not reasonable to assume that owner-operator is more likely to break the law than hired drivers.

Readers of this article may be misled into believing that all taxi drivers are “corrupted.”

I am aware that Klondike Taxi, Grizzly Bear Cabs, Yukon Taxi, and Diamond Taxi have set high standards for their drivers. 

Premier Cabs sets the highest standards for drivers and has actively taken steps to ensure that drivers are not only qualified, but are capable of complying with these standards.

In addition to carefully screened and selected drivers, Premier Cabs drivers are trained to open and close doors, carry groceries and luggage to the door steps, assist seniors and young children, be courteous, honest, trustworthy and friendly.

The suggestion that all taxi drivers are unscrupulous is grossly unfair and demoralizing to the many drivers who are trying to make an honest living out of driving a taxi.

The reporter stated that there is great animosity between taxi companies.

Again, this is untrue as Premier Cabs, Grizzly Bear Taxi, Diamond Taxi and Klondike Taxi have an existing agreement to assist each other in times of trouble as well as sharing trips during high peak times.

As a result of this mutual agreement, the response time is quicker and customer satisfaction is increased.

Although the city is drafting legislation to protect the public against “unscrupulous” taxi drivers, Premier Cabs believes that legislation by itself is not enough to weed out “bad” drivers.

Premier Cabs believes that the most effective way to weed out “bad” drivers is for the city to support taxi companies in developing higher standards for taxi drivers.

The city could render such support by placing a limit on the number of taxi plates. 

When taxi plates are limited by the city, the market will create an intrinsic value for these plates.

As a result, there will be an incentive for those who own taxi plates to protect their intrinsic worth by insistence on higher standards for drivers as well as the vehicle. 

Premier Cabs also believes that the city needs to engage taxi companies, owner-operators, drivers and passengers as partners in drafting this legislation.

Premier Cabs believes such legislation is definitely timely and is in the best interest of passengers; but, at the same time, hopes that the city is willing to consult with key players before incorporating it as bylaws.

Elaine Ong, Premier Cabs

Whitehorse

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