Hats off to Air North

Eleven months ago my wife was diagnosed with mesothelioma, a non-curable cancer of the lining of the lung.

Eleven months ago my wife was diagnosed with mesothelioma, a non-curable cancer of the lining of the lung.

The Yukon government’s Health department covered (almost) every flight in and out of Vancouver. She had to go there nine times thus far. The health department also paid the subsidy of $75 per day for most days she was there. By the way, this daily rate was set in 1992 and has not changed since. We all know this does not nearly cover the costs of expensive Vancouver hotels, but okay, it is better than nothing, I guess.

My wife had chemo treatments and also tried to find other potential treatments to improve her life prognosis and/or her quality of life.

Chemo, radiation and surgery are no longer an option at this point.

She read about a clinical trial underway in Edmonton, for mesothelioma and pursued that. Recently she found out she has been accepted to participate.

The Yukon government health department had indicated that if she would be accepted, they would not provide any financial support or subsidy. Their policy simply is: we do not cover clinical trials. My wife wrote a letter to the health minister asking again to reconsider and provide a subsidy and she received a polite letter in the mail two weeks later declining her request.

We were told by the oncologist in Edmonton, who did not understand YG’s standpoint, that the Alberta government gets $7 million per year from drug companies to run clinical trials.

Do Yukoners not get any financial assistance if such trials might be beneficial for patients, or even if it might give a patient some hope, since there are some positive results from this trial?

All the Yukon government would have to assist with is travel and accommodation. The drug company, via the Alberta government in this case, will pay for the medical team, the hospital, the tests and the drug itself.

We were in disbelief.

Then someone told us: maybe we should contact Air North to see if they might be willing to help out with some of the cost.

My wife picked up the phone and Adam from Air North mentioned he had to talk to his superiors first. He would phone us back. He did within one hour and provided my wife with a great discount for all flights she would need to get to Edmonton, after which she broke into tears.

Thank you, Adam and thank you, Air North.

Lloyd Payne and Carla Mangnus,

Whitehorse

Just Posted

Turtle and rhino fossils fill in ‘massive’ Yukon history gap

Fossils discovered in 1973 are turning heads

In with the old for Dawson City

Town council considers new heritage bylaw

Housing First facility is open, still more work to do, housing advocate says

Residents will be moved in by the end of the month

Whitehorse releases proposed $33M capital budget for 2020

It includes money for upgrading city infrastructure along with focusing on reducing energy use

Whitehorse animal shelter in dire straits, humane society says

Humane Society Yukon is holding a public meeting Nov. 26 to determine shelter and society’s future

Driving with Jens: Yielding is at the heart of defensive driving

If you’re like most people, you probably think about whether you have right-of-way, not yielding

Today’s mailbox: Remembrance Day, highway work

Letters to the editor published Nov. 13

F.H. Collins Warriors beat Vanier Crusaders in Super Volley boys volleyball final

“As long as we can control their big plays to a minimum, we’ll be successful”

Yukonomist: The squirrel, the husky and the rope

The squirrel is political popularity.

Government workers return to Range Road building

The building had been evacuated in October.

City news, briefly

The Food for Fines campaign and transit passes for a refugee family came up at City Hall this week

Rams, Warriors win Super Volley semifinals

The girls final will be Vanier and Porter Creek while the boys final will be F.H. Collins and Vanier

Most Read