Gun training should come early

Gun training should come early Today on the radio, I listened intently as John Edzerza spoke about the abolishment of the long-gun registry and the use, need, and respect of long-guns in northern society. I would like to focus on one aspect of the long-

Today on the radio, I listened intently as John Edzerza spoke about the abolishment of the long-gun registry and the use, need, and respect of long-guns in northern society.

I would like to focus on one aspect of the long-gun registry that fails to garner much media attention, but, in my opinion, is an important improvement that should not be abolished: the mandatory gun-safety training and security check required to obtain a Firearms Acquisition Certificate (FAC).

I have heard a medical association credits the gun registry with the decrease in firearm-related injuries and suicides.

To claim that a passive list of names, addresses, and long-gun serial numbers has decreased any gun-related violence is absurd Ð any benefit has clearly come from the training for the proper care, use and storage of firearms.

Like Edzerza, I grew up in a family that had guns in the house and I too inherited my father’s guns when he passed away.

As a young boy, my father taught me how to safely use and store a firearm.

As a teenager, I participated in the BC hunter-training program and gun safety was a critical portion of the training as it was in the Alberta and Ontario programs I was required to take.

Throughout my military career (22 years) weapons care, safety, and handling were stressed and rehearsed.

When the gun registry program came in I was once again required to take a gun-safety course. I did, and insisted my partner take it Ð not because she wants to shoot, but because should she come in contact with a gun she could ensure it was unloaded and safe.

Training, and testing that training take the mystery, curiosity and fear out of things.

Perhaps we should add safe gun training to our school curriculum?

David Laxton

Whitehorse