Energy security and waste

Energy security and waste Open letter to all elected officials in the Yukon: The local chapter of the Council of Canadians believes we need a Canadian energy strategy. For the national Energy Day of Action, February 4, elected officials all across Yukon

Open letter to all elected officials in the Yukon:

The local chapter of the Council of Canadians believes we need a Canadian energy strategy.

For the national Energy Day of Action, February 4, elected officials all across Yukon and Canada were asked by Council of Canadian chapters to sign, as individuals, a declaration in support of the federal government working collaboratively with all levels of government to ensure that Canadians have energy security, and a plan for reducing dependence on fossil fuels.

A Canadian energy strategy would give Canadians energy security.

Today, NAFTA gives Canada energy insecurity by forcing Canada to export two-thirds of the oil and over half the natural gas produced each year to the US, even though Atlantic Canada and Quebec need to import 90 per cent of their oil.

A Canadian energy strategy would protect the environment.

The tarsands are the fastest growing source of greenhouse gas emissions in Canada, processing bitumen produces three times more emissions than conventional oil production.

Tarsands require two to five barrels of water to produce one barrel of oil. Alberta’s water is being depleted and contaminated. Alarming incidences of rare and serious cancers are occurring downstream from the tarsands.

A Canadian energy strategy would help our economy.

Our economy will benefit when we transition to more sustainable energy production that provides quality, public, ‘green jobs.’ For the harm they create, oil and gas companies receive significant federal subsidies but do not pay a fair share of taxes in Canada relative to their profits, while our royalties are among the lowest in the world.

Canadians want energy policy that provides reliable supplies of oil, gas, and electricity at stable prices while minimizing negative impacts on the environment. To find out more, contact the local chapter: Connie Dublenko, 633-2510. Or visit www.canadians.org

Connie Dublenko, Council of Canadians

Whitehorse