Elder supports Liard First Nation chief

This letter is in response to the article written on Friday, July 6, 2012 regarding the protest held at the Liard First Nation office in Watson Lake.

This letter is in response to the article written on Friday, July 6, 2012 regarding the protest held at the Liard First Nation office in Watson Lake.

Usually I am amused by the inaccuracies of articles written in newspapers, but this particular article caught my attention. Kudos to Vianna Abou for effective use of this tool.

Why is it every time someone has an issue with our government they involve our elders? These members should involve themselves with the real issues facing our nation. If Abou states that she is all about our elders, then here are a few issues she should be protesting against.

The Kaska Dena Council, against our elder’s wishes, continues to try to sign a treaty with B.C. and the federal government that surrenders our Kaska aboriginal rights and title. Maybe Abou should set up a protest in Lower Post at the KDC’s office.

The Liard Aboriginal Women’s Society, an organization mandated to heal former residential school students, has spent millions of our dollars with no tangible results. When LAWS are asked for financial transparency and accountability there begins a rash of protests and petitions against our government.

The very organization mandated to heal former residential school students are behind these protests. In all the years this organization has been around, I fail to notice one healed former student. As a former student myself, I am beginning to wonder where all my healing dollars went?

A board member from LAWS states that our elders are too feeble to attend the general assembly at Francis Lake. Yet in a newsletter from LAWS, it states they will be holding their own elders camp at Francis Lake in August.

An elder states that there is favouritism within the Liard First Nation government, yet this same elder lives in a LFN unit rent free and doesn’t have to pay utilities. Yep, that’s favouritism.

I am a disabled veteran who draws old age pension, pays rent and utilities and also works. I will continue to do so until I can’t get out of bed or fall over, whichever comes first.

I have an elder living across the street from me who is in her nineties. This beautiful elder still packs in her own fire wood, cares for her grandchildren and does moose hides and sews for extra money. And to think we have people who are still capable of working who choose to whine about welfare?

Our government is at a disadvantage. They have to fight the federal government, territorial government, municipal government, other First Nation governments and now our own people. I am satisfied that we have an honest government. To me, as an elder, that is enough.

Alfred Chief

Watson Lake