Brave new Yukon

Brave new Yukon I wish to comment on The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada hearings at the Kwanlin Dun Cultural Centre and the Idle No More Movement held in Whitehorse recently. It was a moving experience for the ex-residential school student

I wish to comment on The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada hearings at the Kwanlin Dun Cultural Centre and the Idle No More Movement held in Whitehorse recently.

It was a moving experience for the ex-residential school students to bravely come forth with their testimonies, a healthy process, which I hope will speedily bring healing for us all. We could say that the social engineers responsible were all wrong in their plans for a speedily assimilation. A few happy social engineers and thousands of victims of their engineering provided a big lesson on the Brave New World speedily on its way.

Voiced also was the concern for the loss of land, which was a few short years ago, (71 years) a pristine landscape. The Yukon was then noted as a land blessed with vast tracks of open land and pure water, animals and fish, and vigorous people, with the mining confined to a few areas that were low-tech, long-term operations.

Unimaginable technology will change the scope of mining, with the idea of using great amounts of investment money, monster machines and a small work force, for a small margin of profit, with the rational that it is a good thing.

In the near Orwellian future, say by 2022, all of humanity will show up at another form of a truth and reconciliation hearing, only there will be another chair set aside – that is for our poor earth, ravaged and raped by technology and expedience, and out for revenge over her loss and beauty. Climate change with have her final say.

It would make an interesting cartoon, with a sad, crying world sitting in a chair giving her testimony, with the telly and computer-addicted silent humanity grouped around?

Pat Ellis

Whitehorse