Aggression overstated

Aggression overstated Re Trevor lives another day (News, Sept. 23): Trevor did not become "dangerously aggressive" after I patted him on the head as was reported by James Munson (News, Sept. 23). Trevor did not ignore me when I walked into the shelter; h

Re Trevor lives another day (News, Sept. 23):

Trevor did not become “dangerously aggressive” after I patted him on the head as was reported by James Munson (News, Sept. 23).

Trevor did not ignore me when I walked into the shelter; he was unsure of me and actually showed some fear of me and then tried to get some distance from me. He had nowhere to go and then he licked my hand before I patted him on the head. Trevor then took a step back as he was tense (which matched the mood in the room).

Trevor took “an aggressive body posture and curled his lips back to expose his teeth” (as reported in the Star, Sept. 23). This did not happen, nor did Trevor lunge at me when I “backed away.”

And contrary to what was also written, Trevor was not “familiar” with me (unless he has read the editorials). Nor was I a “regular” visitor, as was reported by CBC (I have witnesses to verify this, as well).

I have come to expect biased reporting from CBC with respect to nonhuman issues and I hope other reporters don’t go that route because you will only lose credibility. Neither the Whitehorse Star’s Justine Davidson nor CBC reported the fact that, in the previous court hearing, the city of Whitehorse said it is “not calling Trevor a dangerous dog.”

Knowing Trevor’s past, I thought he was doing fairly well (he has yet to be put in a positive environment). He has gone from being chained up to being placed in a cage at the Humane Society, back on a chain with irresponsible people, back in a cage at the city pound, where he never got to go for a walk for weeks, and now back with the Humane Society with many restrictions that you are all aware of.

Dogs I meet during my work show some sign of fear/aggression and some would bite me if given the chance, but people (including myself) don’t normally see this as a problem as the dogs often don’t know me as I approach them. Also, it should be noted, these are dogs that don’t have any of the restrictions Trevor has. After all, many people train and want their dog to be aggressive (this is not illegal).

I have since been out several times with Trevor: for a walk, a run amongst people and other dogs, in the woods, car rides and in my home. Sorry to disappoint the ‘lynch Trevor mob’ out there; he did just fine in all these areas.

Trevor has never had the loving home he deserves and, therefore, has not yet been able to learn proper behaviour. I am sure (with certain precautions) Trevor can be a fine dog.

I will continue to advocate for Trevor (and others) because they have the right to be spoken for and any rational thinking judge will see this.

Mike Grieco

Whitehorse