you gotta have hart

Glenn Hart should come out of the shadows and tell Yukoners precisely why he's cutting $500,000 in community mental health funding. He should explain himself. He should answer questions.

Glenn Hart should come out of the shadows and tell Yukoners precisely why he’s cutting $500,000 in community mental health funding.

He should explain himself.

He should answer questions.

He should lay out the government’s new direction, and why it’s going there.

Not to put too fine a point on it – that’s what a minister’s appointed to do.

It’s a tough job, convincing the population that a decision is the right one – even if it’s unpopular, penalizes society’s most vulnerable and least capable citizens, and appears foolish and niggardly.

RELATED:Community mental health workers cut

Doing so is called leadership.

And, apparently, it’s been so long since the Yukon has seen such behaviour we’ve forgotten what it looks like.

Instead, we’ve grown accustomed to a duck-and-run cabinet made up of people with a talent for shouldering themselves into cheque-presentation events, but who are unwilling or simply incapable of explaining its hard choices.

It leaves one wondering if there’s any plan at all.

In any case, when such a “pilot program’s” funding expires – money that was trumpeted when it was launched – its dependent clients and their families start wondering what they’ll do next.

So what do they do, Hart?

They deserve an answer.

But Hart has locked himself away in the bowels of the Executive Council Office. He’s designated a flak catcher to explain the situation.

Priorities have changed, said Pat Living, Health and Social Services’ spokesperson.

How? Well, Living won’t say.

But, then, that’s not really her job.

After accepting the political benefit of the federal dole, the least Hart could do is come clean when the bottom falls out of the enterprise.

He should explain why, precisely, the territory is not picking up the slack.

After all, presumably the programs were needed when Ottawa underwrote them three years ago.

Today?

Well, as we’ve noted, Hart won’t answer his phone. Living’s doing that.

Fobbing responsibility onto her is not fair.

It’s Hart’s job.

He’s in charge. He should explain why priorities have changed, and how.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Abigail Jirousek, left, is tailed by Brian Horton while climbing a hill during the Cross Country Yukon January Classic in Whitehorse on Jan. 23. Jirousek finished second in the U16 girls category. (Crystal Schick/Yukon News)
Cross Country Yukon hosts classic race

Cross Country Yukon hosted a classic technique cross-country ski race on Jan.… Continue reading

Yukon Premier Sandy Silver talks to media on March 5, 2020. The Yukon government said Jan. 25 that it is disappointed in a decision by the federal government to send the Kudz Ze Kayah mining project back to the drawing board. (Crystal Schick/Yukon News file)
Territorial and federal governments at odds over Kudz Ze Kayah mine project

The federal government, backed by Liard First Nation, sent the proposal back to the screening stage

asdf
WYATT’S WORLD

Wyatt’s World for Jan. 27, 2021

An avalanche warning sigh along the South Klondike Highway. Local avalanche safety instructors say interest in courses has risen during the pandemic as more Yukoners explore socially distanced outdoor activities. (Tom Patrick/Yukon News file)
Backcountry busy: COVID-19 has Yukoners heading for the hills

Stable conditions for avalanches have provided a grace period for backcountry newcomers

Yukon RCMP said in a press release that they are seeing an increase in tinted front passenger windows and are reminding people that it is illegal and potentially dangerous. (RCMP handout)
RCMP warn against upward trend of tinted windows

Yukon RCMP are seeing more vehicles with tinted front passenger windows, prompting… Continue reading

An arrest warrant has been issued for a 22-year-old man facing two tickets violating the <em>Civil Emergency Measures Act</em>. (Joel Krahn/Yukon News file)
Arrest warrant issued for CEMA violation

An arrest warrant has been issued for Ansh Dhawan over two tickets for violating CEMA

The office space at 151 Industrial Road in Marwell. At Whitehorse city council’s Jan. 25 meeting, members voted to sign off on the conditional use approval so Unit 6 at 151 Industrial Rd. can be used for office space. (John Hopkins-Hill/Yukon News file)
Marwell move set for land and building services staff

Conditional use, lease approved for office space

The bus stop at the corner of Industrial and Jasper Road in Whitehorse on Jan. 25. The stop will be moved approximately 80 metres closer to Quartz Road. (Crystal Schick/Yukon News)
UPDATED: Industrial Road bus stop to be relocated

The city has postponed the move indefinitely

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police detachment in Faro photgraphed in 2016. Faro will receive a new RCMP detachment in 2022, replacing the decades-old building currently accommodating officers. (Joel Krahn/Yukon News file)
Faro RCMP tagged for new detachment

Faro will receive a new RCMP detachment in 2022, replacing the decades-old… Continue reading

In a Jan. 18 announcement, the Yukon government said the shingles vaccine is now being publicly funded for Yukoners between age 65 and 70, while the HPV vaccine program has been expanded to all Yukoners up to and including age 26. (1213rf.com)
Changes made to shingles, HPV vaccine programs

Pharmacists in the Yukon can now provide the shingles vaccine and the… Continue reading

Parking attendant Const. Ouellet puts a parking ticket on the windshield of a vehicle in downtown Whitehorse on Dec. 6, 2018. The City of Whitehorse is hoping to write of nearly $300,000 in outstanding fees, bylaw fines and court fees, $20,225 of which is attributed to parking fines issued to non-Yukon license plates. (Crystal Schick/Yukon News file)
City of Whitehorse could write off nearly $300,000

The City of Whitehorse could write off $294,345 in outstanding fees, bylaw… Continue reading

Grants available to address gender-based violence

Organizations could receive up to $200,000

Most Read