Kenyon’s drunk driving strategy — moist wipes and shaving cream

Jim Kenyon has announced a new tool in the fight against drunk drivers. It’s a shaving kit. No, really, it’s a shaving kit.

Jim Kenyon has announced a new tool in the fight against drunk drivers.

It’s a shaving kit.

No, really, it’s a shaving kit.

It includes toothpaste, shave cream, a disposable razor, shampoo, hand sanitizer and, of course, pre-moistened wipes.

Kenyon calls it the Good Host Kit.

“The best strategy for responsible hosts is to pre-plan and do all they can to prevent their drinking guests from driving home after a party,” said Kenyon.

“This convenient kit provides handy solutions for caring hosts who want to make overnight guests feel more comfortable and make gatherings more safe and enjoyable.”

How nice.

The government is subsidizing its bland kit.

The $20 package will cost you $10, roughly half the cost of a bottle of vodka.

But it raises some interesting questions.

For example, given the scope of the alcohol problem in the territory, is ensuring there’s a spare toothbrush and disposable Bic shaver in the cupboard of middle-income Yukoners a good use of government resources?

There is no shortage of Yukon social agencies in need of cash.

The government lacks credible alcohol and drug programs.

As well, this is the government that suspended a full-blown review of the Liquor Act.

Given the holes in the system, Kenyon’s kit seems pathetic.

Of course, there are ways to make it more useful.

The government could include massage oil, condoms, a portable game of Twister, to liven the mix, or, better yet, naughty dice — small, portable and cheap.

An offer of shaving cream is unlikely to get a booze-addled friend to surrender their keys and stay later into the night.

But sex works almost every time. (RM)


Lessons learned

Hats off to Gerry Quarton.

Quarton is a shop teacher at FH Collins Secondary.

Recently, class attendance has been skyrocketing.


Because Quarton has abandoned the traditional chairs and tables projects normally associated with shop class in favour of teaching students how to build snowboards.

Apparently, it has youth excited and, more importantly, engaged.

Quarton, with a little imagination, has come up with a way to make education relevant to students.

Sure, they’re making snowboards. But they’re learning some pretty sophisticated woodworking skills at the same time.

It costs $100 a student, which some argue is pricey. But they’re learning the basics of a trade that could serve them well throughout life.

All in all, it’s a pretty good deal.

And teachers like Quarton deserve a little recognition for keeping youth interested and in school.

You can learn more about Quarton’s class on page 33. (RM)

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