its time to talk about your organs

When you die, what’s happening to your organs? Will they feed worms, or save a life? Far too often, they benefit the worms.

When you die, what’s happening to your organs?

Will they feed worms, or save a life?

Far too often, they benefit the worms.

For some reason, Canadians don’t like having their corpses harvested after they die.

Canada has the lowest organ donor rates among industrialized nations, according to the Organ Donation and Transplant Association of Canada.

It’s a tad odd, when you think about it — it’s not like you’re using your heart, lungs and small bowels after you die.

In fact, organ donation is the closest thing to tangible reincarnation that most of us can look forward to.

But most people don’t think about organ donation.

It makes them squeamish.

But that squeamishness has repercussions.

Every day, ill people waiting for a transplant die needlessly while thousands of healthy life-giving organs are incinerated or buried in the nation’s landfills of the dead.

It’s a waste of lives. And organs.

There are more than 4,000 people waiting for organs across the country. And it’s estimated the organs from one person can save the lives of eight people and improve the lives of more than 30 others.

According to the association, even 90-year-old organs can be healthy enough for transplant.

Serious illness does not necessarily render your organs useless. Doctors will assess their health at the appropriate time.

Donating organs won’t delay or change your funeral. And the procedure won’t disfigure your beautiful corpse.

And doctors won’t scrimp on saving your life if you’ve agreed to donate your organs.

It’s fairly simple.

You have to make your friends and family aware of your desire to donate your organs.

And you should carry an organ donor card in your wallet (they are downloadable from www.organdonations.ca.)

That’s about it.

On Monday, the Student Torch Relay ran through town to raise awareness about organ donation.

It’s one step towards getting beyond the squeamishness.

After all, what would you rather do; help a dying mother or father, or feed the worms? (RM)