Michael Gates

The History Hunter takes a museum road trip

My wife Kathy noticed an announcement in a newspaper that Aug. 7 would be Go Klondike Legacy Day at Bear Creek, the historic mining camp 10 kilometres from Dawson City.

Klondike Sun donates film photo archive to Dawson City museum

Dawson City’s museum received a slice of community life Aug. 7, when it accepted a donation of nearly 100,000 photographs from the Klondike Sun newspaper.

Barney West: the last man executed in the Yukon

Mary Clark-Hendra was expecting a visit from 70 year-old Michael Essanza at her home on May 4, 1932, but he didn’t show up. She hadn’t seen him since April 30, and after his missed appointment, she became worried and contacted the RCMP.

A long, strange trip for Dawson mystery photos

Bill Morrison, from New York, has produced a film about the silent movies found in permafrost in Dawson almost 40 years ago.

Their Own Yukon: a new and improved edition

The Klondike Gold Rush should be remembered not only for the abundance of the yellow metal it produced, but for the wealth of images captured in silver.

New Gold Rush book disappoints

Any new book like this one holds the promise of adding another page or two to the history books.

First Nation and European histories intersect at Carcross

June 30 started out wet and miserable. Not the best day to make a trip to historic Carcross it seemed.

Jack London stories filled with Yukon history

I once wrote a piece about Jack London in which I posed the question: Did Jack London make the Klondike, or did the Klondike make him? The answer, of course, is that London’s Yukon books and short stories were the basis upon which his writing career was established.

William Ogilvie chronicled the time before the gold rush

In 1887, three small groups of men set out for the Yukon. The first representatives sent by the Canadian government, they helped define what the Yukon was to become.

History Hunting on the Hepburn Trail

Thursday of last week I went history hunting on a little known Whitehorse historical feature. The Hepburn Trail, or more accurately, the Hepburn Tramway, was an important element of Whitehorse gold rush history.

Mystery object shines light on Dawson’s history

This object is 203 centimetres long, 66 centimetres high and 33 centimetres wide. Made of painted metal and glass, it is awkward and difficult to pick up or carry.

Rain fails to dampen spirits at Jack London Festival

Michael Gates Special to the News This past weekend in Dawson City there was a celebration all about Jack London, the great American author, and his Yukon connection.

The story of Kate Carmack revealed in new book

Imagine being married by arrangement to a person who doesn't speak your language, or practise your traditions. You are then dislodged from your homeland and find yourself far away from your family.

Historic telegraph office re opened after many years

More than 200 enthusiastic guests turned out Wednesday evening at the MacBride Museum despite wind, rain and low temperature, for the celebration of the old, the new, and one Whitehorse family's contribution to the history of the Yukon.

World War I conference adds to Yukon history

Every province across the country (except Quebec) has made World War I part of the curriculum; we commemorate Remembrance Day as a national holiday and the poppy is a universally understood symbol across the land.

Cad Wilson – and such a nice girl too

The Klondike attracted entertainers in abundance during the gold rush. Some of them went on to remarkably successful screen and stage careers.

Two gunned down at event in Skagway

It had been raining since noon on Saturday, April 30 in Skagway, but that didn't seem to dampen the spirits of the approximately 200 people who attended the opening of the historic site on Second Avenue. 

New exhibit to reveal Jewish gold rush history

A new exhibit will be launched at the MacBride Museum at 5 p.m. on May 2. It will present a piece of Yukon’s hidden history – the Jewish presence in the Klondike gold rush.

Yukon beyond the Armistice

Armistice for World War I was declared at 11:00 a.m., November 11, 1918. The guns were silenced after more than four years of slaughter and depletion.

Words and music to go to war to

There is something about mustering for “King and Country” that stirs a nascent lyrical instinct of the heart in men and women when a nation goes to war.