Michael Gates

Passchendaele: Remembering Yukon’s brave and fallen soldiers

Ninety nine years ago, the Battle for Passchendaele (also known as the Third Battle of Ypres) lasted from July 31 to November 10, 1917.

The Peace River trail to the Yukon

In 1898, Inspector Moodie of the North West Mounted Police had proven that a route to the Klondike overland from Edmonton was possible, if not realistic or practical.

The overland trail from Edmonton to the Klondike

On August 27, 1897, Commissioner L.W. Herchmer, the head of the North West Mounted Police, issued written orders to Inspector J.D. Moodie.

New documentary links Dawson City to Hollywood

The story of film, the Klondike Gold Rush and Hollywood are intimately intertwined by director Bill Morrison in the film Dawson City: Frozen Time, which is, at once, both a documentary and an art film.

Slaughter on the Klondike Trail

I have just returned from a trip to Bennett City, British Columbia, at the terminus of the Chilkoot Trail, where I went to investigate a century-old abattoir site.

The great cattle drives to the Klondike

Before the Klondike gold rush, a Juneau butcher named Willis Thorp got the bright idea that there might be a market for beef in the tiny gold camps of Forty Mile and Circle City.

Cattle drive to Slaughterhouse Slough

Some years ago, I uncovered an intriguing collection of photographs at the Bancroft Library in Berkeley, California.

Sam Steele: the man behind the “Lion of the North”

In the pantheon of gold rush luminaries, Sam Steele stands tall and imposing: an incorruptible man of unquestioned integrity, who ruled with an iron hand, but one wearing a velvet glove.

Frances Muncaster: From socialite to wilderness woman

She was an American woman who gave up the life of high society, comfort and privilege to live the tough life of a miner in the wilds of the Yukon and northern British Columbia.

The towns where silver was king

Much Yukon history has been hidden by the immense shadow of the Klondike Gold Rush. Such was the case with the silver mines of the Keno district.

Pioneer banner a reminder of community spirit

When you visit the Binet House Museum in Mayo, you will see some interesting artifacts. There is an iron lung, a relic from the era when the scourge of polio was much feared.

Mike Mancini: Keeper of the Keno City flame

Kathy and I recently visited the Keno City Museum in search of the quintessential artifact — something from the collection that defines the essence of the community.

The History Hunter takes a museum road trip

My wife Kathy noticed an announcement in a newspaper that Aug. 7 would be Go Klondike Legacy Day at Bear Creek, the historic mining camp 10 kilometres from Dawson City.

Klondike Sun donates film photo archive to Dawson City museum

Dawson City’s museum received a slice of community life Aug. 7, when it accepted a donation of nearly 100,000 photographs from the Klondike Sun newspaper.

Barney West: the last man executed in the Yukon

Mary Clark-Hendra was expecting a visit from 70 year-old Michael Essanza at her home on May 4, 1932, but he didn’t show up. She hadn’t seen him since April 30, and after his missed appointment, she became worried and contacted the RCMP.

A long, strange trip for Dawson mystery photos

Bill Morrison, from New York, has produced a film about the silent movies found in permafrost in Dawson almost 40 years ago.

Their Own Yukon: a new and improved edition

The Klondike Gold Rush should be remembered not only for the abundance of the yellow metal it produced, but for the wealth of images captured in silver.

New Gold Rush book disappoints

Any new book like this one holds the promise of adding another page or two to the history books.

First Nation and European histories intersect at Carcross

June 30 started out wet and miserable. Not the best day to make a trip to historic Carcross it seemed.