The waters have peaked — probably

The water level has peaked in the Southern Lakes region, said Environment hydrology manager Richard Janowicz on Wednesday.

The water level has peaked in the Southern Lakes region, said Environment hydrology manager Richard Janowicz on Wednesday.

It hit its high Tuesday at 6 p.m. and has since dropped two centimetres, he said.

“If projections remain correct, it should stay stable for about a week and then start dropping slowly.”

But it all depends on Mother Nature.

“Everything is based on meteorological conditions,” he said.

“At this point, it’s the rainfall that’s the major contributor.”

Rainfall over the past two days caused water levels to rise an additional five centimetres.

However, there is a dry spell predicted for the next five days, he said.

“And we’ve come over the hump in terms of temperature.

“Winter is on its way.”

Melting glaciers are the biggest contributor to water level and with things starting to cool down the flooding should subside, said Janowicz.

“Although in the last week, we’ve been above-average temperatures,” he added.

If the weather co-operates, water levels in the Southern Lakes region are expected to begin dropping about five centimetres a day, said Janowicz.

Now that levels on Army Beach Road have been lowered, emergency measures crews are focusing on removing water from smaller areas where water has built up, said Emergency Measures spokesperson George Maratos.

“And we are cutting back on volunteers.”

On Monday, emergency measure had 85,000 sandbags available for residents in need.

“Hats off to the volunteers — it’s quite remarkable,” said Maratos, noting the flood has brought the Marsh Lake community together. (GK)