Staking ban in Ross River to continue to 2017

The Ross River staking ban has been extended for another two years.

The Ross River staking ban has been extended for another two years.

Unless the Yukon government and the Ross River Dena Council can come to an agreement, no staking will occur in a large swath of eastern Yukon through Jan. 31, 2017.

The Yukon Court of Appeal ruled in Dec. 2012 that the Yukon government must consult the Ross River Dena Council before allowing staking on its traditional territory.

Since then, the government has tried to reach an agreement on which parts of that land should be open for mineral staking.

But so far there’s little to show for that work.

A full staking ban in the area has been in place since Dec. 2013, which was the deadline to comply with the court order.

Talks with the First Nation are going well, said Michael Hale, assistant deputy minister for aboriginal relations, in an interview this morning.

“We are having more regular meetings and more positive meetings on this file than we have in a long time. That certainly doesn’t guarantee an outcome, but it tells us that it’s worth investing our time.”

The two-year extension will give some space for that work to continue, he said.

“We don’t want this to be something that’s hanging over people’s heads. We want to be able to work towards some sort of outcome.”

The ban could be lifted before the 2017 deadline if the parties can reach an agreement, said Hale.

“Our hope is that before two years we’re able to get somewhere with Ross River. But it’s hard to predict the future, so we’ve given ourselves enough time to make an arrangement.”

The Ross River Dena Council could not be reached for comment by press time.

Just Posted

Win some, lose some: Whitehorse council approves 5 of 7 infill parcels

‘I don’t think anyone has the right to say “my neighborhood is sacred, no one can come here”’

Proposed Whitehorse capital budget heavy on infrastructure funding

‘We’ve seen an unprecedented amount of infrastructure dollars from the federal government’

Victoria Gold plugs into power purchase agreement with Yukon Energy

Power company estimates mine near Mayo will spend $100 million on power over 10 years

Lack of staff closes Watson Lake’s only daycare

Facility can’t afford to pay competitive wages to attract staff, board president says

Straight and true: the story of the Yukon colours

Michael Gates | History Hunter Last week, I participated in the 150th… Continue reading

Get ready to tumble: Whitehorse’s Polarettes to flip out at fundraiser

‘There’s a mandatory five-minute break at the end, just so people don’t fall over’

Alaska’s governor goes to China

There are very different rules for resource projects depending on which side of the border you’re on

Yukon survey shows broad support for legal pot

But there’s no consensus on retail and distribution models

Yukon government releases survey on the territory’s liquor laws

Changes could include allowing sale of booze in grocery stores

Get family consent before moving patients to other hospitals: NDP critic

‘Where is the respect and where is the dignity?’

Bill C-17 passes third reading in House of Commons

The bill, which will repeal controversial amendments made to YESAA by Bill S-6, will now go to Senate

White Pass and Yukon Route musical chugs on without director

The cast and crew of Stonecliff are pushing forward without Conrad Boyce, who went on medical leave

Most Read