Faro’s eviction battle gets extended

Justice Ron Veale rushed through the civil court docket Tuesday afternoon before turning his attention to Faro's eviction battle against two town residents. "Now for the main event," he said.

Justice Ron Veale rushed through the civil court docket Tuesday afternoon before turning his attention to Faro’s eviction battle against two town residents.

“Now for the main event,” he said.

Angelika Knapp and Eric Dufresne, a couple who run a seasonal outdoors business on the outskirts of Faro, walked to the defence table with two heavy binders.

After a four-year court battle concerning the zoning of the land they live and work on, the couple can no longer afford a lawyer and are representing themselves.

But today Faro was going to plead it was broke.

The town’s lawyer, Lori Lavoie, was accompanied by a senior lawyer from her firm, Debbie Hoffman, who did most of the talking during Tuesday’s hearing.

“We could deal with the petition today,” said Hoffman, referring to the request Faro filed early last month stating that Knapp and Dufresne must file for a special land-use permit or leave the property.

Faro has spent too much money on this court case, she said.

“The town has a small tax base,” she said.

Knapp and Dufresne were visibly upset and they followed Hoffman’s comments with their own claim to poverty.

Veale decided the petition wouldn’t be decided during yesterday’s hearing.

He extended the petition deadline until January 4.

The town’s ultimatum, initially presented to the couple in early November, demands they apply for a special kind of zoning or face eviction.

The original deadline was yesterday.

But Faro switched tactics midway through November.

The original petition called for Knapp and Dufresne to send a letter requesting the special zoning.

That was after the couple took Faro to task in court because there was no application form for the zoning.

But on November 23, Faro sent the couple a formal development permit application to be used for the zoning request.

Knapp and Dufresene complained to Veale on Tuesday about Faro constantly moving its targets.

Veale told them Faro was trying to make things easier for their application.

But because of the change, the deadline was slotted for January 4.

Knapp and Dufresne tried to prolong a followup court hearing after the town’s deadline until the spring.

Dufresne does seasonal work in the Northwest Territories for the latter half of the winter and would be gone by early January, they said.

But Faro began this petition in early fall so that a resolution could be reached before the summer 2011 business season, said Hoffman.

If the hearing were put off until May, as the couple requested, they might already be handling customers, she said.

Veale agreed it was a long wait and set a follow-up hearing to evaluate the results for January 13.

Contact James Munson at

jamesm@yukon-news.com

Just Posted

Silver rules out HST, layoffs and royalty changes

Yukon’s financial advisory panel has released its final report

City of Whitehorse budgets $30M for infrastructure over four years

‘I think we’re concentrating on the most important things’

Yukon community liaison for MMIWG inquiry fired

Melissa Carlick, the Whitehorse-based community liaison officer for the national Missing and… Continue reading

Yukon man holds no grudge after being attacked by bison

‘The poor guy was only trying to fend off someone who he knew was trying to kill him’

Straight and true: the story of the Yukon colours

Michael Gates | History Hunter Last week, I participated in the 150th… Continue reading

Get ready to tumble: Whitehorse’s Polarettes to flip out at fundraiser

‘There’s a mandatory five-minute break at the end, just so people don’t fall over’

Alaska’s governor goes to China

There are very different rules for resource projects depending on which side of the border you’re on

Yukon survey shows broad support for legal pot

But there’s no consensus on retail and distribution models

Yukon government releases survey on the territory’s liquor laws

Changes could include allowing sale of booze in grocery stores

Get family consent before moving patients to other hospitals: NDP critic

‘Where is the respect and where is the dignity?’

Bill C-17 passes third reading in House of Commons

The bill, which will repeal controversial amendments made to YESAA by Bill S-6, will now go to Senate

White Pass and Yukon Route musical chugs on without director

The cast and crew of Stonecliff are pushing forward without Conrad Boyce, who went on medical leave

Most Read