Keith Halliday

Econ 101 in BC: The HST referendum

In a strange turn of events, British Columbians who have successfully avoided economics classes their entire lives are now being subjected to a typical microeconomics final exam question: Which is better, a traditional sales tax like the old BC PST or a v

Psephology 101, or election math for dummies

Successful politicians often have an uncanny knowledge of electoral math. Jean Chretien would often arrive in a city and startle the locals with his detailed poll-by-poll knowledge of the ridings in play.

Oilsands are here to stay

Sometimes big things happen so close that you don't realize you are living through a historic moment. The emergence of the Alberta oilsands, also known as heavy or nonconventional oil, could be one of those things.

The moose in the F 35 fighter jets’ room

The controversy of Canada's possible multi-billion dollar purchase of F-35 fighters has mostly been about the government's procurement process and whether the cabinet has been honest about the true costs of the F-35s over the jets' full lifetime.

Greed and grand visions on the Dalton Trail

They don't make men like Jack Dalton anymore. Tough, resourceful, a born leader. And mean as a wolverine. People who got on his wrong side tended to end up dead.

New community theatre venture off to a strong start with Naked

It was an evening of firsts. Canadian premiere of Fiona Sprott's Often I Find That I Am Naked, directed by Eva Hamburg. First production by Whitehorse's new Larrikin Entertainment group.

The Guild offers up entertaining and thought provoking drama

The Guild's new production of Dedication by Terrence McNally is an entertaining and thought-provoking night out. Adding more zip to the evening is how the play is about a struggling community theatre in a small town.

The Guild does it again with The Cripple of Inishmaan

We laughed. We cried. We cringed. The Guild’s new production of The Cripple of Inishmaan is an intense two-hour immersion in the camaraderie and viciousness of small-town life.

No silver bullet, just steel rivets

Housing is one of those issues that does poorly in our system of government. It's complex, immune to quick fixes and requires both big investment and long-term planning.

Food truck frenzy in Whitehorse

Food trucks are a “thing” in trendy West Coast cities like Portland, Seattle and San Francisco. And Whitehorse is joining the craze.

It appears Yukoners love Alaska’s legal weed

In a reversal of the Klondike stampede, people from the Yukon are now rushing southwards to Skagway over the Trail of ‘98 in search for a rare and valuable commodity.

On real Yukon time

One of the good things about democracy is that it surfaces ideas the political elite may not be worried about.

Good news for Yukon gold miners based on strong fundamentals

You may not be interested in the commodity markets but, to paraphrase Leon Trotsky, the commodity markets are interested in you.

The Yukon’s biggest killer

After a series of columns on fiscal policy, I thought readers this week might enjoy a new topic: cancer.

Grading the budget

Premier Sandy Silver brought down his first budget last week. Now almost six months since he was elected, many were keen to see how his campaign speeches translated into budget reality.

Do the North Koreans know Rotary Park is a nuclear free zone?

If conversation at your dinner table ever gets dull, I suggest you pull out a globe and challenge someone to stretch a rubber band to show the flight path between North Korea’s nuclear launch sites and Chicago.

Commissioner Jim Smith: The end of an era

Legendary Yukon Commissioner Jim Smith has died. He was 97.

Northern Cross drops a $2 billion bomb on YG

Northern Cross’s lawsuit against the Yukon government’s fracking moratorium could work out to about $60,000 per Yukoner.

Alaska’s $3 billion budget hole

Unlike its Alaskan cousin, the Yukon legislature never invites economists to present their views while it deliberates the budget. After viewing the Powerpoint presentations Alaskan economists recently made before the Alaska Senate’s labor and commerce committee, I can see why.

Silver’s upcoming budget mid term test

Expectations are high for Premier Sandy Silver’s upcoming budget. By the end of April, it will be almost six months since he was elected premier.